Disabled and Flying

Do you know of any airlines that can provide a lower rate for me to fly across the country (safely and with my wheelchair)?

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I flew on commercial aircraft during my business career for a couple of million miles on mostly US airlines. I’m now disabled so I’m watching the big legacy carriers with keen interest. Sadly, I know of no commercial airline that allows anyone to remain in their wheelchair during regularly scheduled service.

Nor am I aware of any discounts for disabled people.- we’re mixed in with the rest of the passengers fighting for the best seat at the best price.

Nothing is guaranteed. No airline in the world allows you to remain in your wheelchair. Southwest uses their own crew and seems more careful. The only other suggestion is check the airline ratings for number of mishaps with wheelchairs.

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I once asked for a bereavement fare and it was more expensive than first class. That was in the 80s.

We have traveled extensively by air, sea and van. I haven’t seen any break in fares for disabled. But they have arranged for us to sit at the bulkhead do seats wouldn’t recline into me.

I almost always brought a small bag of treats for the flight attendants. That served many purposes.

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I have never sern any break on price fir fosabled travelers. They will ship adaptive equipment without charge. When I fkew to/from Alaska I took both
my scooter and my rollator and they weee treated as checked baggage. The airlines assist3d me with orovif8ng a wheelvhsur and a person to push me to assist me getting to the plsne and from one plane to another when I had to switch for 2nd leg of flight. I was abke to fet down using my folding cane. Since that time my health has deteriorated abd I have not flown lately so I am not sure if I ciuld now manage. I do travel but it us usualky ny car and cruise ship
I have found Holland America to ge exceptional when assisting people such as myself.

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There are no discounts at all… we pay the same as everyone else. You also need to transfer out of your chair on any airline and into an airplane seat, no ifs ands or buts. If Southwest serves your area I would suggest using them as they do have the most wheelchair friendly policies and procedures of any airline out there. Depending on what type of wheelchair you have (manual vs. power) and it’s size you may be able to take your chair all the way to the front row of seats and do a direct transfer. They always let the real wheelchair users board first. Just be prepared to be the last one off the plane at the end of the flight.

They don’t provide discounts for the disabled. You will have to gate check your chair and ride an “aisle chair” to your seat. Get a seat near the front. Move your seat cushion to the aircraft seat to reduce bed sores. You have a 3% chance they will damage your chair. Carry on anything you must have for self care, they lose luggage too. But don’t let anything keep you from travelling.

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What’s an “aisle chair”? Sounds like flying involves at least 2 transfers onto the plane and 2 out…phew!

We have curtailed much of our air travel since I became wheelchair dependent. We did fly in May on Alaskan airlines and broke down and got the first class tickets so I had less far to move.

No discounts I have found for disabled.

Make sure that you take a bag with any medications, a change of clothes, with you on to the plane. This has saved us headaches more then once.

Now we are saving up for a last trip to Europe.

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No breaks for disabled travelers. Alaska Air has been good to us. We get on the plane first and they are very good about helping you to your seat with their aisle wheelchair. They help with your hand items and carryon luggage as well and bring your wheelchair back to you at the ramp. Haven’t had any breakage problems with my scooter. Make sure you fill out theor wheelchair form and bring it with you to checkin the wheelchair or scooter before going through security. Have also flown American, British Air, and Aer Lingus and like them all. Fly business class if you can

I wish I did. You could always contact the PR office of the airlines and put your case. They are looking for stories that make them look good as they are getting lots of criticism for not being accessible.

Great tip about Candy for aircrew.
I just started the petition “Accessible Air Travel For All” and wanted to see if you could help by adding your name.

My goal is to reach 1,500 signatures over the next few days and I need more support. You can read more and sign the petition here:

Thanks!

I just started the petition “Accessible Air Travel For All” and wanted to see if you could help by adding your name.

My goal is to reach 1,500 signatures over the next few days and I need more support. You can read more and sign the petition here:

Thanks!
Pekka

An Isle Chair is a skinny metal chair you sit on and they strap you in it, and go to your seat where you can transfer to the airline seat. I am a small person , and I really wonder how a big person fits on this tiny seat. I now fly first class just to have a larger, more comfortable seat. I find it a rush getting from the metal seat to the airline seat as these men are NOT trained to help with the transfer!!! They seem to think it would be easier to just pick me up and set me down. and there is no way in hell that will happen!